Tag Archives: Pomegranate Tree

5 Self-Pollinating Fruit Trees for Alpharetta Georgia Landscapes

Standalone self pollinating flowering and fruiting trees for alpharetta georgia include peach

Need help choosing standalone fruit trees for your Alpharetta, Georgia landscape? Knowing which fruit tree species self-pollinate will help you choose individual fruit-bearing trees that provide your Alpharetta, Georgia landscape with shade, beauty, and delicious fruit.

72tree.com gathered species and growing information for several self-fruiting trees hardy to Alpharetta, Georgia, landscapes.

What is a Self-Pollinating Fruit Tree?

Most fruit trees are self-sterile for their own pollen (requiring a second compatible tree and a pollen vector). However, self-pollinating fruit trees only need their pollen to self-fertilize and bear fruit, and they can be planted as a standalone tree. As the name suggests, these trees do not require pollen vectors (bees, flies, wasps, etc.). Consider the following self-pollinating fruit trees for your Alpharetta, Georgia, landscape:

1. Pomegranate (Punica granatum)

Standalone self pollinating fruit trees for alpharetta georgia include pomegranate

Pomegranates can be grown as large shrubs or small trees with smooth, evergreen leaves, and showy orange to red flowers. It produces rounded and seeded fruit with a dry outer covering.

Mature Size – Pomegranates reach 10 to 20 feet in height and have a 10 to 20-foot spread.
Soil Needs – This species thrives in loam, sandy, and clay well-draining soil with a 5.5 to 7.2 pH.
Sun Requirement – Full sun (minimum 6 hours daily)
Water Needs – Irrigate every 7 to 10 days during dry conditions. Pomegranate trees require approximately 60 inches of water annually.
Fruiting – Pomegranate trees typically produce a harvest two to three years after planting. Most varieties flower from spring into fall and fruits (set in March or April) will be ready for harvest between August and October.
Hardiness Zone – 7 through 10

2. Peach (Prunus persica)

Standalone self pollinating fruit trees for alpharetta georgia include peach

Peach trees typically grow a rounded crown with upward-reaching branches draped in three to six-inch-long, dark green, deciduous leaves.

Mature Size – Peach trees reach 25 feet in height and have a 25-foot spread (when left unpruned).
Soil Needs – This species thrives in lightweight loamy, well-drained soil with a 6.0 to 6.8 pH.
Sun Requirement – Full sun (minimum 6 hours daily)
Water Needs – Irrigate daily with 35 – 40 gallons during summer months. Peach trees require approximately 36 inches of water annually.
Fruiting – Peach trees typically bear fruit 2 to 4 years after planting. A peach tree may bear fruit from June through August, with some species bearing fruit through September.
Hardiness Zone – 4 through 9

3. Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)

Standalone self pollinating fruit trees for alpharetta georgia include apricot

Apricot trees have an upright growth pattern with a broad canopy. The leaves are ovate with a rounded base, pointed tip, and serrated margin. The tree produces white to pink flowers and fleshy yellow to orange fruit. Apricots are self-pollinating, but planting two different varieties (blooming simultaneously) can result in a significantly larger harvest.

Mature Size – Full-size apricot trees reach 25 feet in height and have a 25-foot spread.
Soil Needs – This species thrives in loamy, well-drained soil with a 6.5 to 8.0 pH.
Sun Requirement – Full sun (minimum 6 hours daily)
Water Needs – Provide your apricot tree with an inch of water every ten to 12 days.
Fruiting – Apricot trees typically bear fruit 3 to 4 years after planting. Blooming in early spring only on two-year or older wood. Fruits ripen and should be harvested from June through August.
Hardiness Zone – 4 through 9

4. Fig (Ficus carica)

Standalone self pollinating fruit trees for alpharetta georgia include fig

The common fig tree is a deciduous, multi-trunk tree with smooth, gray bark and a wide but low, open canopy. This species has large multi-lobed, showy, dark green leaves and produces small, inconspicuous flowers.

Mature Size – Fig trees reach 10 to 30 feet in height with a 20-foot spread.
Soil Needs – Figs prefer moist, well-drained, organically rich soil with a 6.0 to 7.5 pH.
Sun Requirement – Full sun (minimum 6 hours daily)
Water NeedsFig trees need 1 to 1-1/2 inches of irrigated water or rainfall per week (minimum).
Fruiting – Most fig trees take three to five years before ripening fruit. Figs typically form on new stem growth each year and ripen from May through November.
Hardiness Zone – 8 through 10 (6 and 7 if protected)

5. Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana)

Standalone self pollinating fruit trees for alpharetta georgia include persimmon

The common persimmon is a deciduous tree grown for its beautiful foliage and delicious fruit. When the fruit ripens, they range in color from yellow to red-orange.

Mature Size – Persimmon trees reach 35 to 60 feet in height with a 20 to 30-foot spread.
Soil Needs – Persimmon trees grow best in loamy, well-drained soil with a 6.0 to 6.5 pH.
Sun Requirement – Full sun (minimum 8 hours daily)
Water Needs – Water a persimmon tree for 10 minutes once or twice weekly in the spring and summer. Persimmon trees can withstand short drought periods.
Fruiting – Persimmons are a fall crop typically ripening from early fall through early winter. There are two primary varieties of persimmons (The astringent fruit is consumed when it becomes soft, and the non-astringent fruit is eaten while firm.
Hardiness Zone – 4 through 9

Self-Pollinating Fruit Trees

In this article, you discovered species and planting information for several self-pollinating fruit trees ideal for landscapes in Alpharetta, Georgia.

Knowing which self-pollinating trees to plant in your Alpharetta, Georgia landscape will help you grow magnificent shade trees that provide an abundant annual fruit harvest.

Avoid planting trees that require attention, pollination, or not knowing which self-pollinating species are most suitable for your Alpharetta yard.

Sources:
extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C997
sites.redlands.edu/trees/species-accounts/peach/
plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/prunus-armeniaca/
hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/fig/
missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=279917

Pomegranate Tree Information, Questions and Answers

Tree cutting service Alpharetta Ga pomegranate fruit

One of the healthiest fruits you can consume comes from the Punica granatum (pomegranate) tree. But how much do you really know about this amazing tree species?

Pomegranate trees produce the incredible pomegranate fruit and have been cultivated for several millennia. Relatively easy to care for, this tree, its flower, and fruit all have profound historical and cultural significance.

www.72tree.com gathered pomegranate tree information and history, care tips, and answers several frequently asked questions.

Pomegranate Tree Information

Pomegranate is a tree species native to the region of Iran to Afghanistan and Pakistan to Northern India. Today, the species is cultivated throughout the Middle East, Northern and Tropical Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, and parts of the Southwestern United States.

Tree Name – Pomegranate
Scientific Name/Species – Punica granatum
Family – Lythraceae
Genus – Punica
Nickname – Winter Jewels, Red Ruby, and Chinese Apple

Pomegranate care tree service Alpharetta Ga

Lifespan – Can live up to 200 years or more when planted in optimal conditions.
Type – Deciduous.
Hardiness Zone(s) – from 8a to 13a
Soil Requirements – Versatile, prefers well-drained rich, fertile soil with full sun exposure.
Planting Spacing – 5 to 6ft
Watering Requirements – Regular when young or planted. Minimal thereafter.

Height – 15ft on average. Can reach 30ft under optimal conditions.
DBH – NA
Crown Span – 8 to 10ft or more at maturity.
Root Spread – Wide and shallow (10-25ft from the trunk and 2 to 3ft deep)
Uses in Landscaping – Highlight tree, border or division, and addition to orchards.

Winter/Fall Colors – Yellow before leaf-drop in the fall.

Pests – Healthy pomegranates are incredibly resilient to insect attacks but may see aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs, and thrips in the spring and summer months. Neem oil or other organic insecticides can be used to control them easily.
Disease – Keeping your pomegranate tree healthy will help it avoid or fight rot, anthracnose, and fungal wilt.
Major Disease Threat – Heart Rot

Pomegranate Origin and History

Originating from Iran to the Himalayas in northern India, Punica granatum (pomegranate) has been grown for several millennia, and was cultivated and naturalized over the extent of the Mediterranean region.

It wasn’t until 1769 that Spanish settlers introduced the first pomegranate specimen to California. Two and a half centuries later, pomegranate trees can be found throughout the US in a commercial capacity as well as in private landscapes and potted in our homes.

Armenian culture sees the pomegranate as a semi-religious icon. A symbol representing abundance, marriage, and fertility, the fruit and its juice are used with Armenian food, heritage, and wine.

Tree care Alpharetta Ga pomegranate fruit

As the fruit contains numerous seeds, it is perceived to symbolize fruitfulness. Thus, fostering the tradition to eat the fruit on Rosh Hashana. Besides several mentions in the Bible, some believe the fruit has 613 seeds corresponding to the 613 commandments found in the Torah.

Care Tips for Pomegranate Trees

Pomegranate trees do not require much attention. They are very adaptable to their environment and remarkably resilient to infestation and illness when healthy.

The following tips will assist you in keeping your pomegranate tree(s) healthy and thriving.

Planting Location and Soil – Pomegranates will adapt to nearly any well-drained soil condition regardless of its pH. As long as your specimen receives full sun and is protected from temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, it should thrive.

Watering – Pomegranate roots grow within the first 2 to 3 feet of soil and do not require deep watering. Keep the soil moist for the first 8 months to 1 year, and again when the tree is bearing fruit.

Tree removal Alpharetta Ga pomegranate watering

Once the tree’s roots are established, you can cut back to 2 waterings per month in the drier months. By this time though, your tree will be able to tolerate drought conditions.

When the tree is bearing fruit, you can prevent the fruit from splitting by keeping the soil moist.

Fertilizer – After planting a pomegranate tree, you do not need to fertilize it for a full year. The use of organic mulch (manure or compost) will suffice.

Thereafter, each spring, you can apply 2 ounces of nitrogen granules. Increase the dose 1 ounce for each subsequent year.

There are fertilizers specially formulated for fruit trees which may be used as well.

Pruning – Pomegranate trees produce flowers on new growth and can be pruned to remove damaged or dying branches, to shape the tree, or to remove suckers, dead wood, and unwanted growth.

The best time to prune your tree is late winter or early spring before the buds break, and when the threat of frost has subsided.

Be cautious of over-pruning, as it will reduce the amount of fruit your tree is able to produce.

Emergency tree removal Alpharetta Ga pomegranate flower

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Do All Pomegranates Have 613 Seeds?
Answer: No. While some will debate that all pomegranates have this number of seeds, it would be quite easy to prove the contrary.

Question: What Are Pomegranate Seeds Called?
Answer: Arils.

Question: Are Pomegranates Anti-Inflammatory?
Answer: Studies show that pomegranates have excellent anti-inflammatory properties.

Question: What Vitamins Are in Pomegranate Seeds?
Answer: Pomegranates have B vitamins including folate, vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium.

Question: Are Pomegranates an Antioxidant?
Answer: They have high contents of polyphenols and are renowned for their antioxidant capabilities.

Alpharetta Ga pomegranate tree care tips

Question: How Long Does It Take for Pomegranate to Fruit?
Answer: Pomegranate trees can take up to 7 months for their fruit to fully mature. The tree itself will only bear fruit after two to three years of hearty growth.

Question: When Do Pomegranate Fruits Ripen?
Answer: Pomegranate fruit in the northern hemisphere typically ripens from September to February, and from March to May in the southern hemisphere.

Pomegranate Trees and Fruit for Your Landscape and Health

Cultivated for thousands of years, the pomegranate tree and its fruit have been gracing landscapes and providing powerful antioxidants through vitamin-rich seeds for generation after generation.

In this article, you discovered the history of the pomegranate tree, how to care for them, and the answers to many common questions about the species.

Growing a pomegranate tree is easy when compared to other fruit trees, and should be a part of your landscape. With a little patience and care, you could have ripening pomegranates in under three years.

Sources:

https://www.science.gov/topicpages/t/total+pomegranate+tannin
https://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/pomegranate.html
https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/pomegranate/