Tag Archives: Trees

How is Your Tree Fighting Global Warming

Forest trees are carbon sinks fighting global warming and climate change

Did you know that your tree is part of a global carbon sequestration system that sustains breathable air for the human race? In fact, without trees, life on earth as we know it would cease to exist.

72tree.com gathered essential information about the role of carbon sinks and how keeping your tree healthy plays a vital role in combating global warming and sustaining breathable air.

What Are Carbon Sinks

A carbon sink is a natural system that absorbs, uses, and stores carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Technically, you could say that anything that absorbs more carbon than it releases is a carbon sink.

Earth’s principal carbon sinks are:

Trees and Plants – Trees and plants use carbon dioxide captured from the atmosphere for their photosynthesis (food making) process.

Oceans – The oceans play a significant role in storing carbon dioxide. Some marine life will capture the gas for photosynthesis, while some of the gas simply dissolves in the water.

Soil – As plant life dies and decomposes, a portion of its captured carbon dioxide is transferred to the soil.

Nearly a quarter of the carbon dioxide humans have released into the atmosphere has been absorbed by trees and plants. As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels increase, so increases carbon fertilization.

Carbon Fertilization and Tree Growth

As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels increase, more is available to convert to plant matter through photosynthesis, and trees can grow more. This increased growth is referred to as carbon fertilization.

Trees fighting climate change as carbon emmissions rise

Because of carbon fertilization, trees will continue to grow larger and for more extended periods, as long as their necessity for water, sunlight, and nutrients (primarily nitrogen) is met. If a tree is missing just one of these necessities, it will not grow regardless of the abundance of the others.

Tree Planting and Forest Conservation

Tree planting and forest conservation are vital activities towards the reduction of mankind’s carbon footprint, as trees are remarkably efficient at carbon sequestration, they provide up to 30% of the global action required to stop climate change.

In fact, a single healthy tree is capable of releasing around 6,000 pounds of breathable oxygen over 50 years. That’s about the oxygen consumption of 4 people per year.

With 3.04 trillion trees worldwide and a world population of 7.53 billion, trees alone produce approximately 4,845 pounds of oxygen per person per year. While this number seems reasonably sufficient, carbon emissions are on the rise around the globe, leaving the ominous question of “How long can our trees sustain our oxygen requirements?”

Along with rising carbon emissions, trees and forests, do not always act as carbon sinks. In fact, massive carbon releases by trees may occur at any time when triggered by:

• Deforestation
• Tree and plant decay
• Forest fires
• Wildfires
• Volcanic eruptions

Forest wildfire causing trees to release massive amounts of carbon

Suffice it to say that as long as carbon emissions continue rising, and the global tree population is threatened, the delicate balance of carbon sequestration and oxygen production can easily slide in the wrong direction.

Tree and forest conservation is one of our best weapons to fight global warming, and it starts in your yard. Keep your trees healthy by making sure they:

• Are planted in the right place
• Have the best soil type for the species
• Have sufficient water
• Are fertilized before their growth period
• Are seasonally pruned
• Are properly mulched
• Inspected annually for disease and infestation

Tree planting to fight global warming and for forest conservation

Learn more about planting trees at 72tree.com/tree-planting-guide/

When living near or visiting a forest, you can participate in its conservation by:

• Camping in only designated areas
• Removing or disposing of your trash properly
• Building fires in designated fire-pits
• Fully extinguishing fires before leaving
• Disposing of matches and cigarette butts properly
• Not discharging fireworks
• Reporting suspicious activities
• Notifying park rangers of dead or dying trees
• Avoiding all activities that can physically harm trees

Learn more about forest conservation and preventing wildfires at redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/wildfire/how-to-prevent-wildfires.html

Camping and forest preservation wildfire prevention

Your Tree, Climate Change, and Global Warming

It may be hard to imagine, but by keeping your trees healthy, you are actively pushing back against climate change and global warming. The human race owes its breathable air to the global population of trees, as they sequester carbon dioxide and release the oxygen we breathe.

In this article, you discovered the function and importance of carbon sinks, how your tree plays a significant role in global oxygen production, and how healthy trees and forests help to stop climate change and reverse global warming.

By keeping your trees healthy, you are actively participating in the reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide, thus slowing climate change and global warming.

Sources:
https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/features/CarbonCycle/page5.php
https://www.americanforests.org/blog/forests-carbon-sinks/
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/carbon-dioxide-fertilization-greening-earth
https://www.conservation.org/stories/Pages/14-forest-conservation-facts-you-need-to-know.aspx
https://www.npr.org/2015/12/26/461095807/tree-counter-is-astonished-by-how-many-trees-there-are

The Stunning Southern Magnolia Tree and its Flower

Magnolia grandiflora open white flower in spring

The Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) is an essential tree for yards and landscapes in hardiness zones 6 through 10, for its size, year-round beauty, and its enormous creamy white flowers.

72tree.com gathered essential information on the Southern magnolia tree, its characteristics, incredible flowers and their blooming season.

Magnolia Tree Information

Magnolia grandiflora, with its full luxurious look, is a favorite specimen around the world. The following are some of its features:

Family – Magnoliaceae

Height – 50 to 80 feet at maturity with some reaching 90 feet.

Width – The base of a fully mature magnolia can reach 40 feet in diameter.

Foliage – Mature leaves are dark glossy green and densely grow up to 8 inches in length by 5 inches wide.

DBH – The diameter at breast height of a fully mature magnolia tree can reach 24 to 36 inches.

Crown Width – This species grows in a pyramidal shape, its mid and lower sections can reach a diameter of 30 to 40 feet and tapers upward to a pointed or rounded crown.

Leaf Drop – While Magnolia grandiflora is an evergreen species, it will drop light foliage throughout the year.

Magnolia grandiflora tree with open white flower

Blooms – The flowers of Magnolia grandiflora are creamy white and can reach up to 12 inches in diameter.

Pests – While magnolia trees are generally free of significant pest problems, some varieties of scale, aphids, mealybugs, spider mites, and leafminers present potential infestations.

Disease – There are several fungi which can cause leaf spots, and in some cases, may lead to heart rot. However, for the most part, fungi are unable to cause any significant damage to adult magnolias. In the event of severe leaf drop or branch dieback, an arborist should be called to evaluate the situation and recommend a course of action.

This magnificent species, native to the southeastern United States, has been planted in cities all over the world. It’s no wonder that Magnolia grandiflora became an instant hit when it was taken to Europe in the 1700s.

Due to its adaptability to many climates and soil types, and its unique beauty, this species has become one of the most widely planted ornamental evergreen trees in the world.

To learn more about the USDA Hardiness Zone Map, read Trees, Shrubs, and the USDA Hardiness Zone Map at 72tree.com/trees-shrubs-usda-hardiness-zone-map/

Magnolia Tree Flower

Magnolia grandiflora flower blooming in spring

The majestic Southern magnolia tree has an incredibly dominating presence from mid-summer through the end of winter. However, in early to mid spring, this specimen displays its true glory and reason for its worldwide admiration.

When the Southern magnolia blooms, it blooms at the tips of twigs all over with dozens of white lemon citronella-scented flowers open at a time. Healthy mature magnolias bloom consecutively until mid-summer, and these enormous flowers range in size, reaching up to 12 inches in diameter and lasting up to 7 days from bloom to wilt.

The Magnoliaceae family is among the eldest of tree families in existence. Due to this, we get to witness two pre-evolutionary aspects of flowers:

Tepals, not Petals – In magnolia flowers, the petals are fused with the sepals (sepals are typically green and function as protection for the flower while in bud); therefore, the correct terminology for these parts is tepals. The tepals of the magnolia flower are usually arranged in two whorls of 3 to 6 tepals each.

Magnolia grandiflora tepal of blooming flower

No Nectar Here – That’s correct, magnolia flowers do not produce nectar. These flowers attract pollinating beetles with their fragrant and sugary secretions.

The beautiful magnolia flower is the state flower of Mississippi and Louisiana, while the tree itself is the state tree of Mississippi. It should come as no surprise that the largest Southern magnolia is located in Smith County, Mississippi, measuring more than 122 feet tall with a DBH greater than 6 feet.

The Flowering Magnolia Grandiflora

If you live in the South and your landscape doesn’t include a Southern Magnolia, you’re missing out on one of the oldest and most beautiful blooming evergreen trees in existence.

In this article, you discovered a wealth of information about the Southern magnolia tree and its beautiful flowers.

If your property lies within hardiness zones 6 through 10, and you have yet to plant a magnolia tree, you should consider doing so for the beauty of the tree and the elegance of its sensational flowers.

Sources:
https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/all/magnolia-grandiflora/
https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/magnolia/
https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=863
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st371

Trees, Shrubs, and the USDA Hardiness Zone Map

Choose trees plants and shrubs using the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

If you have ever gone into the nursery and picked a plant or tree, later to realize it was not suitable to be planted in the environment in which you live, this can be avoided. Besides the scientific plant name and care instructions, you will notice the hardiness zone printed on its tag.

The USDA Hardiness Zone Map splits North America up into 11 separate planting zones. Each individual planting zone is around 10°F colder (or warmer) than the adjacent zone during an average winter. If you’re reading a plant description in a gardening magazine and you see a mention of a hardiness zone, then it’s likely referring to the USDA Hardiness Zone map.

What are Hardiness Zones?

A hardiness zone is based on average annual extreme minimum temperatures across a 30-year period. It’s not based on the lowest recorded temperature in a region or what might possibly happen in the future. Gardeners must keep this in mind as they choose plants and trees, especially if they are planning to “push” the hardiness zone they live in by planting trees and plants not suited for that particular hardiness zone. Something else to keep in mind is that there could be microclimates that won’t show up on a map – even one as detailed as the current USDA PHZM map.

Eastern Zones vs Western Zones

Eastern Zones – The USDA map is great at its job of outlining the different gardening climates of the eastern half of North America. This is a comparatively flat area, which means it can be mapped out by drawing lines approximately parallel to the Gulf Coast around every 120 miles as you progress north. The lines will start to tilt northeast as the Eastern Seaboard approaches. The USDA map also accounts for the special climates caused by the Appalachian mountains and the Great Lakes.

Western Zones – A range of factors including winter lows, elevation and precipitation determine the growing climates in western North America. The weather in the west floats in from the Pacific Ocean, becoming less humid as it moves around the mountain ranges to the west. The growing climates in the west can vary quite a bit compared to the east, where cities in similar zones can grow the same plants in the same climates. The weather – and the plants that can be grown in it – in coastal Seattle are much different than what you can expect in the higher and more inland Tucson, Arizona. This is in spite of both cities being a part of zone 8 of the USDA map.

To find the zone for where you live, see http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

Ideal Trees and Shrubs for Alpharetta and Roswell Ga

Many of our customer’s aim to improve their well-manicured yards with trees, shrubs, and flowers. Of course the right sunlight, soil, and moisture conditions are factors needed for these plants to flourish. After being asked for specific species, we created a short list of popular trees and common shrubs that will thrive in Alpharetta and Roswell Ga. 7a and 7b are the zones for North Georgia, so next time you visit the nursery, be sure to look for plants that are conducive to living in these zones.

Other Factors to Consider with the Hardiness Zone Map

There are other environmental factors that determine whether a plant succeeds or fails on top of the hardiness zones. Wind levels, soil type and moisture, humidity, pollution, winter sunshine, and snow are all major contributing factors to plant survival. Whether or not a plant survives can also depend on where it is planted, how it is planted, their size, and their overall health.

The map was most recently updated in 2012 when the USDA adjusted the plant hardiness map to account for the warmer global temperatures occurring over the past thirty years. Refer to this resource when purchasing trees and plants for your garden and landscape.

Interactive Map: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/phzmweb/interactivemap.aspx

3 Tips for a Healthy Summer Lawn and Garden

You don’t need a landscape expert to tell you that your lawn is under intense heat when the summer sun arrives. This is why you must proactively take care of the lawn and prepare so that it will retain its health and appearance.

Summer is when many homeowners choose to list and present their home to buyers. The exterior – lawn, landscaping, and curb appeal – is what will draw and attract buyers to your home.

Keep your garden and lawn fresh this summer by following these simple and easy to implement tips:

1. Keep Chemical Fertilizers Away from Your Plants

Organic and natural solutions are typically best when compared with chemical fertilizers. Though chemical fertilizers can ignite growth and vitality, an unintended counteraction may leave you with an insect infestation problem.

This issue arises as using fertilizers during summer encourages super growth, which would require more pruning, trimming, mowing and watering. This creates a problem because as you overwater the plants, insects will invade the plant. Use natural solutions to treat and care for your plants, and if you have insect problems, see 72tree.com/using-dormant-horticultural-oil-treat-tree-insect-infestations/

2. Always Mow Your Yard and Prune your Trees

Give your lawn, shrubs, and trees that wonderful view when you regularly mow your yard, trim and prune your trees. You will be proud of yourself when you go to relax in the garden and you begin to enjoy the rich view and healthy smell.

Your soil conditions and type of grass will determine the frequency at which it should be cut. 3 inches is an optimal height for summer, but be aware that cutting your grass too low, will lead to weed invasion and heat damage.

Weeds are another thing to tame because they can rob your soil and grass of valuable nutrients. This may eventually lead to their taking over your yard. Keep your lawn cut, watered, and free of weeds.

Tree trimming is not only done for aesthetics and safety reasons, it also actually improves the overall health of trees shrubs. Structural appeal is important, but pruning boosts the development and growth of your plants when performed properly.

For more on tree pruning visit treecareadvice.blogspot.com/2016/03/tree-pruning-why-how-and-when-to-prune-trees.html

3. Strategically Plant and Water Your Landscape

When planting, take into account the amount of direct sunlight needed for each species. Identify the locations in your yard that have partial shade, and use these as needed. You want to add mulch to your flowerbeds to keep pests off and retain moisture in the roots.

You might want to consider watering your plants adequately and often if you reside in an area that is overly dry. You’ll be surprised at the rate to which plants dry up during the summer months. Create a simple schedule and do your best to prevent that from happening.

When watering, make sure you water deeply so that it will get to the roots of the plant because that’s where the “engine” of the plant is.

Tip – Some decorative plants are drought tolerant and don’t require frequent watering. Lithops, Wallflowers, and Verbenas are beautiful flowering plants that have a great low to moderate watering tolerance.

Maintenance of Your Landscape

There’s a different maintenance routine for all properties and landscape. It is highly advisable that you seek the services of a professional in Landscape on deciding the best method for maintenance of your property. Always remember that your landscape is what will attract visitors and buyers alike to your property, so be sure to dish out a best first impression.